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Everald Brown Dove Harp – Jamaica

It wasn’t hard to miss this colorful object, called a dove harp, that was part of an exhibition on view at the National Museum of Jamaica (formerly the Institute of Jamaica). I thought I recognized the work as belonging to one of our local artists but I wasn’t sure.

A quick look at the caption confirmed that the object was the creation of intuitive artist, Everald Brown, popularly called “Brother Brown.”

Everald or Brother Brown's Dove Harp

Dove Harp

Continuing, the caption noted that Brown’s “art and spirituality are bound together and are distinctly indicated through his work. His art work is the visual representation of a generously all-inclusive world view, in which just about everything is regarded as being spiritually meaningful. Brother Brown’s musical instruments bring together sound and vision, the two most important components of his mystical experiences. Their shapes and decorations are laden with intricate symbolism and were originally meant for collective ritual use by his church band.”

Everald Brown, a self-taught artist, was born in Clarendon, Jamaica in 1917. He embraced Rastafarianism and Revivalism and founded the Assembly of the Living, a mission of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, in Kingston.

In 1973, Brown moved his family from Kingston to a community in rural St. Ann where they lived off the land. There, his art and spirituality flourished and he painted and carved his dreams and visions of the world around him. He also created handmade musical instruments, like the dove harp, and star banjos.

Following his death in 2002, the National Gallery of Jamaica mounted a retrospective of his work in 2004. It featured more than 100 paintings, carvings and musical instruments.

 

This week, I’m linking up with Travel Photo Thursday, which Nancie at Budget Travelers Sandbox organizes. Be sure to head over and check out other photos from locations around the world. Enjoy!

Beach Dreaming and a Giveaway

The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever. – Jacques Cousteau

I love the beach. I love the sea, I love looking at it, being near it, and being in it. I love the sounds of the waves, whether they’re lapping gently or crashing to the shore.

Sunrise at Boston Beach, Jamaica

Sunrise at Boston Beach

The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea. — Isak Dinesen

I didn’t realize how important being near water was to me until some years ago. I was restless and out of sorts. Nothing I tried brought me back to myself. Then my best friend reminded me that we hadn’t gone to the beach at all that summer. It was November and cold so I bundled up, hopped on the train and took myself to Coney Island.

Morning at Boston Beach, Jamaica

Morning at Boston Beach

I still remember crossing the boardwalk, stepping onto the sand and hearing the roar of the sea. It stirred something so deep inside, I began to sob, then weep uncontrollably. A light rain had started to fall but I didn’t care. I found a huge rock near the water’s edge and sat for hours watching the waves grow larger and larger as the approached the shore, then become smaller and smaller as they receded. By the time I left, I felt at peace. I felt whole again. Since then, I never go for more than a few weeks without going to the beach. Being able to see the sea or having access to it is as important to me as how many bedrooms I have.

Boats at Negril Jamaica

Negril boats

It’s been more than a month since I’ve been to the beach and I’m getting antsy. A fractured ankle has kept me away from home and my daily view of the sea from my back porch. Now my thoughts are filled with images of beaches I’ve been and ones I’m yet to explore.

Dump Up Beach, Mobay

Mobay Beach

I can’t wait to rid my ankle of its bandages, sink my toes into the warm sand and dip them into the cool water.

The sea is flat as glass

On Jamaica’s north coast

The day I took this photo, the sea was so choppy along the coast, Falmouth-bound ships were redirected to Montego Bay. I was surprised to see how flat it was here, as flat as glass.

 If you’re lucky enough to be at the beach, you’re lucky enough. Unknown

Treasure Beach view, Jamaica

Treasure Beach

Playing football near the sea, Hector's River, Jamaica

Football near the sea

Fishermen going out to sea, Little Ochie Jamaica

Sunset boats

As much as I love the sea, I doubt I’d want to be a fisherman.

Boats waiting for the sun to set, Negril Jamaica

Waiting for the sun to set

This is the life!

Sun setting on another day at Rick's Cafe Negril Jamaica

Sunset at Rick’s Cafe

Some people can’t live without the mountains, I can’t live without the sea.

Mountain or sea, which are you?

 

This is my submission to Travel Photo Thursday, which is organized by Nancie at Budget Travelers Sandbox. Be sure to head over and check out more photos from locations around the world.

For even more travel photos, please check out Becca’s Friday Daydreaming series at Rwethereyetmom. Hope to see you there! 

Summer Beach Bag Giveaway –

In celebration of summer and the beach, I’m giving away a beach bag to one lucky winner. Enter by June 8th by leaving a comment, tweeting about the giveaway #beachbaggiveaway or liking us on Facebook. It’s that easy. Unfortunately, the giveaway is open only to addresses in the United States. Good luck! 

 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

A Jamaican Georgian Inspired Building

This building has captured my interest for about a year. At first, I thought it was a restored Georgian because it’s near Half Way Tree in Kingston where a few other Georgian buildings, like the St. Andrew Parish Courthouse, the St. Andrew Parish Church and the Oakton House are located.

I consulted friends and family in Kingston, heritage and restoration professionals and architects but months later, I was no further along than when I started. Finally, after posting it on Facebook, I got a nibble. A few people said it was in private ownership but nothing on the backstory. For example, was it a restored Georgian, like I thought. If it is, what was there before, are there photos, etc. I’m still curious about that and will update this post if I find out.

A Kingston office built in the Georgian style

A Jamaican Georgian Inspired Building

In the meantime, I decided that it has either borrowed from or retained certain elements that made me think Georgian. For example, the quoins (those are the white blocks at the corner of the building. Quoins are one of the main features of Georgian architecture. They’re usually larger and more prominent than the surrounding blocks.), brick construction, the columns, and what appears to be a modified hip roof, a roof with sloping sides and ends that’s distinctively Georgian.

Georgian architecture was popular in Jamaica between the 1750-1850. It was named for the architectural style that was all the rage in England during the reigns of King George (I, II, III and IV, 1714-1830) and features simplicity in form, symmetry and balance. The style was adopted by wealthy plantation owners for the homes and commercial buildings they built in Jamaica and the colonies, with modifications, such as louvres, verandahs, etc., to suit the local climate.

This is my submission to Travel Photo Thursday, which is organized by Nancie at Budget Travelers Sandbox. Be sure to head over and check out more photos from locations around the world.