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Jamaican-Style Mango Chutney

Following Emancipation, the colonial authorities in Jamaica looked as far as China and India for workers to replace the formerly enslaved Africans.

Between 1845 and 1917, nearly 40,000 Indians arrived in the island looking for a better life. More than a third were forced to stay after their period of indentureship as they couldn’t afford to pay their way back and the government thought it wasn’t cost effective to repatriate them.

The Indians brought not only their talent and skills, they brought their food and spices, specifically mango, tamarind, jackfruit and several plants. They also gave us curry.

Another of the culinary gifts the Indians gave Jamaica is chutney, mango chutney to be specific. Chutney, a condiment, can be either wet or dry and can contain a combination of fruits, spices, herbs and vegetables.

Jamaican-Style Mango Chutney

Jamaican-Style Mango Chutney

It’s been several years since I’ve had the kind of mango chutney we make in Jamaica and hadn’t thought about for almost as long. Then a couple of months ago, I got an unexpected treat when I attended a celebration for a longtime family friend.

They served the typical Jamaican fare – mannish water soup, curried goat, escoveitch fish, jerk chicken, rice and peas, etc., and at each table mango chutney along with salt, black and chopped Scotch bonnet peppers.

Having not seen mango chutney for so long, I wasn’t sure at first what it was. But an older cousin, who sat at our table tasted it, a smile slowly brightened his face. This tastes exactly like what my grandmother used to make, he said.

The mango chutney was equal parts sweet (from the raisins and mango), tangy (ginger and vinegar) and hot (Scotch bonnet pepper). When I added it to the curried goat, the flavors danced in my mouth.

When we were ready to leave, I noticed one of the servers packing up left over mango chutney, coconut drops, and suckling pig. I wasn’t shy about asking if I could take some of the mango chutney home.

In talking with her, I found out that her mother had made the chutney. Her mom, she said, had learned the skill from her mother. She introduced me to her mother and I thanked her for the chutney. I had it with crackers, chicken, even fish. I wished I had some now.

Jamaican-Style Mango Chutney
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Ingredients
  1. 6 lb. mangoes
  2. 1 1/2 bottles cane vinegar or white wine vinegar
  3. 2 pounds sugar
  4. 1 ounce Scotch bonnet peppers, minced
  5. 4 ounce ginger, diced
  6. 1 lb. dark raisins
  7. 1 lb. golden raisins
  8. 4 cloves garlic
Instructions
  1. Combine cut up mango, raisins and peppers, add to vinegar, sugar, ginger, garlic, onions and other seasonings. Boil all ingredients together gently until chutney is thick and brown.
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Comments

  1. I didn’t know that mangoes and tamarind originally came from India. The chutney sounds wonderful, something special for a holiday, a little like Christmas with the ginger and raisins.
    Lesley Peterson recently posted..Dining at London’s top churchesMy Profile

  2. Yup, both came from India. Chutney’s great to eat any day of the week but especially lovely for the holidays.

  3. I’ve just linked my recipe and it’s a chutney/pickle too! Mind you I never have worked out the difference between a chutney or a pickle. I love mango chutney but mangos are really expensive here in France. Last year however I made a peach chutney using the same recipe and substituting peaches for mangoes – it was lovely 🙂
    Rosie recently posted..Chilli Courgette PickleMy Profile

  4. Seems quite a bit of things are expensive in France, Rosie. Glad you’ve found a substitute for your pickle.

  5. I never knew before if mangoes can be processed into such a tasty sauce. Honestly I never tried it, but it looks delicious to me.
    Erwin recently posted..Benefits of Organic Virgin Coconut OilMy Profile

  6. Hi Marcia! This sounds delicious. I love mango. Sorry that I haven’t been around much. I’m hoping you’re having a new Foodie Tuesday this week (Sept.2). My post is ready to go 🙂
    Nancie ( recently posted..Travel Photo Thursday — 28/8/14 — Penang’s Padded ArtMy Profile

  7. Hi Nancie, I hope you get to try it. Do you have mango where you are?