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The Italian American Museum in Manhattan’s Little Italy

Anchoring the corner of Mulberry and Grand Streets in New York City’s Little Italy is an attractive 19-century brick building that is the home of the Italian American Museum.

The Italian American Museum in Manhattan's Little Italy

Exterior of the museum

The idea for a museum to document the history of the Italian community in New York came about after the highly acclaimed exhibition, The Italians of New York: Five Centuries of Struggle and Achievement, which opened at the New York Historical Society in October 1999.

The museum founder, Dr. Joseph Scelsa received its charter in 2001. It operated initially on W44 Street before moving in 2008 to its permanent home, 155 Mulberry Street, after museum officials bought the Banca Stabile building from Dr. Jerome Stabile III. Dr. Stabile’s family started the bank in 1882.

Banca Stabile, which was founded by Francesco Rosario Stabile, was a fixture in Little Italy at a time when Mulberry Street was described as the Italian Wall Street, for the number of banks that were there.

The bank became a one-stop community center, providing financial, translation, insurance, travel and money transfer services. It was a link between the immigrants in New York and their relatives and friends back home.

When Banca Stabile closed in 1932, the family kept the building, including its vault, tin ceiling, marble floor and counters, bronze grilles, and teller cages intact. They also retained items such as steam ship tickets, safe deposit boxes, bank books, passports, and deeds.

The 1,000 square foot museum is bursting at the seams with memorabilia from the bank and those that families have donated. Among the items on exhibit is the gun that retired NYPD police officer, Francesco “Frank” Serpico owned. Serpico was the cop who blew the whistle on police corruption in the 1960s and 70s.

There are also several marionettes from Miguel “Papa” Manteo, photos and other information about Luigi del Bianco, chief carver at Mount Rushmore, and assorted other items that illustrate the history of Italians in New York.

The Italian American Museum, at 155 Mulberry Street, is opened on Saturdays 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., on Sundays from noon to 6:00 p.m., and by appointment during the week. For a $5.00 suggested donation, visitors to the small storefront museum are shown a short film and are able to see these memorabilia up close.

 

Linking to Travel Photo Thursday, which Nancie at Budget Travelers Sandbox organizes. Be sure to head over and check out more photos from locations around the world.

Comments

  1. Interesting museum 🙂
    Muza-chan recently posted..Valentine’s Day… romantic nightMy Profile

  2. I think it’s wonderful that so much of this history is being preserved and that people can catch glimpses of the essence of Little Italy through the ages. I think it would be fun for Italian grandparents to take their grandkids on a tour. 🙂 Thanks for linking up this week.
    Nancie recently posted..Travel Photo Thursday – February 13, 2014 – Chiang Mai’s 38th Annual Flower FestivalMy Profile

  3. This was awesome, Marcia! I’ve told you before how much I love history. So many fascinating things and that Serpico part would definitely intrigue me. I’m so jazzed Dr Scelsa was able to make this happen. Thank you for sharing it with us! 🙂
    Mike recently posted..Phoenix, My Golden Retriever, The Notorious Ball Cap BanditoMy Profile

  4. You’re welcome, Mike. I never used to like history when I was in school. It’s a lot more fascinating in context.
    Yes, kudos to Dr. Scelsa for making this museum happen.

  5. Oh, you’re welcome, Nancie. Yes, I can imagine how much fun it is to see that continuity.
    Hope you have a great week.

  6. I’d like to have a look at this museum. Fascinating, the immigrant history of New York – from Italy and the rest of Europe.
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  7. lovely Museum .
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